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Posted on 18th Apr at 10:27 AM, with 33 notes
Through A Caregiver's Eyes »

letstalkaboutrape:

missvoltairine:

letstalkaboutrape:

riotsnotdiets:

Check out this awesome project we’re working on — a tumblr for caregivers to share their stories through personal photographs. Please follow and reblog if you see anything that strikes a chord, and if you know any caregivers please encourage them to submit at http://www.throughacaregiverseyes.com/submit!

This is a project I’m coordinating at my job! It’s a really powerful project and I’d love to see more caregivers submit photos and help spread these important images around. Thanks!

I really hope you are vetting submissions to make sure that the people submitting photos are actively seeking the permission of the subjects of these photos to have their images spread around on the internet. Just because someone is disabled does not mean they won’t have an opinion about abled people using their images without their consent. I see a lot of inspiration porn-type stuff and sketchy representation of disabled people just on the first page and like… I think it’s good to talk about how “pink collar” professions like caregivers and nurses etc are undervalued, but it’s just as important that those conversations happen in ways that don’t dehumanize and condescend to and encourage negative stereotypes of disabled people (“disabled people are a burden on families” etc). 

Thanks for your comments. You’re right that consent is incredibly important in a project like this and that’s something that we’re working on actively to make sure it happens. The goal of this project is to demonize cuts that are being proposed by the governor’s budget in California to the homecare program that supports caregivers and the seniors and people with disabilities they care for (many of whom are their own family members). These cuts have the potential to be really devastating to a lot of families. It’s our goal that seeing images of the reality of caregivers’ lives and the lives of people they care for will humanize them for some legislators who might otherwise think about them as budget numbers on a page waiting to be slashed.

May I suggest that if your goal is to demonize proposed cuts to caregiving to also accept submissions by disabled people affected?  It’s unfortunately been a long and damaging trend for campaigns about the disabled to focus on those around us, and I think it should be possible and important to show how the cuts would affect those actually living with disability and our relationships with our caregivers, in addition, of course to caregivers (with permission) posting their side as well.

Posted on 18th Apr at 8:54 AM, with 29,951 notes
"The reality is that fat people are often supported in hating their bodies, in starving themselves, in engaging in unsafe exercise, and in seeking out weight loss by any means necessary. A thin person who does these things is considered mentally ill. A fat person who does these things is redeemed by them. This is why our culture has no concept of a fat person who also has an eating disorder. If you’re fat, it’s not an eating disorder — it’s a lifestyle change."

Lesley Kinzel (via curvesahead)

I will always reblog this because it is so so important. 

(via infinitetransit)

I just want to nail this to every stable surface I can find. I cannot count the amount of times that I’ve seen fat folks being encouraged, cajoled, and even forced into behaviors that would be recognized as disordered eating/exercising patterns in thin folks. 

Pretty much everything that’s done on shows like The Biggest Loser would be called out as pro-ana/pro-orthorexia in a thin person. Exercising past the point that it hurts, to the point where you’re throwing up, even injuring yourself? Berating yourself because you didn’t lose ENOUGH weight this week? Constantly talking about how fat is weakness and thinness will make everything better, about how you can’t stand to be your current weight anymore? Emphasis on weight as a sign of how much control, strength, and worth you have? Viewing food as bad, as a temptation to sin? Constant sharing and talking about tips on how to minimize food intake, how to lose weight? 

That sounds exactly like every pro-ana/pro-mia blog I’ve ever seen. It’s also what fat people are told we need to be doing to ourselves until we’re thin. 

(via madamethursday)

Posted on 18th Apr at 8:53 AM, with 4,467 notes
"I’ve experienced firsthand how the “model minority” narrative– this strange tendency to assume that Asians are simply a quiet, high-achieving community tagging along with our white brethren into a melting pot of joy–effectively de-legitimizes our voices in conversations about promoting racial justice. Leaving our voices and experiences out of the fight for racial justice erases our long, often tragic history in this country and homogenizes all Asians into one, high-achieving blob. Leaving us out means turning a blind eye to the fact that 1 in 6 Filipino-Americans and 1 in 4 Korean-Americans are undocumented, that Southeast Asians have the highest high school dropout rates in the country, that Asian American students are the most bullied ethnic group in classrooms, and that Asian women are consistently hypersexualized, objectified, and orientalized via widespread media representations. If you choose not to include us in discussions on racial justice, you are telling us that our struggles don’t matter."
Posted on 18th Apr at 8:42 AM, with 13,675 notes

neopollotan:

Whenever I get sad about my anatomy I look at Rob Liefeld’s art and that cheers me up.

image

Posted on 18th Apr at 4:30 AM, with 5,671 notes
soulbrotherv2:

An African Princess Who Stood Unafraid Among Nazis
Her autobiography is a one-of-a-kind perspective of an educated, empowered, world-traveling daughter of a royal family, which no one wanted to publish until now.

By Jenee Desmond-Harris
Between 1939 and 1946, Fatima Massaquoi penned one of the earliest known autobiographies by an African woman. But few outside of Liberian circles were aware of it until this week, when Palgrave McMillian published The Autobiography of an African Princess, edited by two historians and the author’s daughter.
The book follows Massaquoi, born the daughter of the King of Gallinas of Southern Sierra Leone in 1904, to Liberia, Nazi Germany and the segregated American South, where she wrote her memoirs while enrolled at Tennessee’s Fisk University.
She died in 1978, and her story could have died with her.  [Continue reading complete article at The Root.]

soulbrotherv2:

An African Princess Who Stood Unafraid Among Nazis

Her autobiography is a one-of-a-kind perspective of an educated, empowered, world-traveling daughter of a royal family, which no one wanted to publish until now.

By Jenee Desmond-Harris

Between 1939 and 1946, Fatima Massaquoi penned one of the earliest known autobiographies by an African woman. But few outside of Liberian circles were aware of it until this week, when Palgrave McMillian published The Autobiography of an African Princess, edited by two historians and the author’s daughter.

The book follows Massaquoi, born the daughter of the King of Gallinas of Southern Sierra Leone in 1904, to Liberia, Nazi Germany and the segregated American South, where she wrote her memoirs while enrolled at Tennessee’s Fisk University.

She died in 1978, and her story could have died with her.  [Continue reading complete article at The Root.]

Posted on 17th Apr at 11:28 PM, with 15,137 notes
"What is interesting, is that the Frida Kahlo venerated by American feminists is a very different Frida Kahlo to the one people learn about in Mexico, in the Chicano community. In her country, she is recognized as an important artist and a key figure in revolutionary politics of early 20th century Mexico. Her communist affiliations are made very clear. Her relationship with Trotsky is underscored. All her political activities with Diego Rivera are constantly emphasized. The connection between her art and her politics is always made. When Chicana artists became interested in Frida Kahlo in the ‘70s and started organizing homages, they made the connection between her artistic project and theirs because they too were searching for an aesthetic compliment to a political view that was radical and emancipatory. But when the Euro-American feminists latch onto Frida Kahlo in the early ‘80s and when the American mainstream caught on to her, she was transformed into a figure of suffering. I am very critical of that form of appropriation."
— Coco Fusco on her Amerindians piece from 1992 with Guillermo Gómez-Peña (via tofunkey)
Posted on 17th Apr at 10:01 PM, with 33 notes

missvoltairine:

Through A Caregiver’s Eyes

letstalkaboutrape:

riotsnotdiets:

Check out this awesome project we’re working on — a tumblr for caregivers to share their stories through personal photographs. Please follow and reblog if you see anything that strikes a chord, and if you know any caregivers please encourage them to submit at http://www.throughacaregiverseyes.com/submit!

This is a project I’m coordinating at my job! It’s a really powerful project and I’d love to see more caregivers submit photos and help spread these important images around. Thanks!

I really hope you are vetting submissions to make sure that the people submitting photos are actively seeking the permission of the subjects of these photos to have their images spread around on the internet. Just because someone is disabled does not mean they won’t have an opinion about abled people using their images without their consent. I see a lot of inspiration porn-type stuff and sketchy representation of disabled people just on the first page and like… I think it’s good to talk about how “pink collar” professions like caregivers and nurses etc are undervalued, but it’s just as important that those conversations happen in ways that don’t dehumanize and condescend to and encourage negative stereotypes of disabled people (“disabled people are a burden on families” etc). 

Seconding this, it’s really important to get consent from the people being cared for here, otherwise it becomes something that draws attention to caregivers only at the expense of dehumanizing those being cared for.

Posted on 17th Apr at 6:53 PM, with 1,198 notes
County attorney says he will prosecute Shanesha Taylor for felonies »

soulrevision:

[For more on social justice, follow me on Instagram: soulrevision]

Despite public outcry, Maricopa County Attorney Bill Montgomery said Wednesday he will move forward with the felony child abuse prosecution of Shanesha Taylor, the jobless mom whose Scottsdale arrest has drawn national attention and prompted calls for Taylor to receive assistance rather than punishment. 

Attorney Bill Montgomery’s office received a petition on Tuesday with 12,000 signatures asking for Shanesha’s charges to be dropped. "First, they weren’t signatures; they were just a list of names," Montgomery said, referring to a printout from the website. "So I don’t know whether any of the individuals in their pajamas who logged on to the site and put their name on there really had a clue of all the circumstances involved in this particular case.

Apparently signatures aren’t good enough, let’s call County Attorney Bill Montgomery’s office & tell him to drop the charges against Shanesha Taylor —-> (602) 506-3411

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